Monthly Archives: November 2013

Bookslinger Update: “Interest”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Literary Pasadena introduced by Michelle Huneven, published by Prospect Park Books. The historic, handsome city in the shadow of Los Angeles has been a creative hotbed since the Arroyo Arts & Crafts scene of the early twentieth century. This literary journal gathers short fiction by such Pasadena-area writers as Michelle Huneven (Blame), Victoria Patterson (This Vacant Paradise), Jervey Tervalon (Understand This), Naomi Hirahara (Snakeskin Shamisen), Lian Dolan (Helen of Pasadena), Ron Koertge (The Arizona Kid), Dianne Emley (the Nan Vining mysteries), and Jim Krusoe (Parsifal).

Produced as a companion to LitFest Pasadena (May 2013), Literary Pasadena: The Fiction Edition is the first in an annual series that will move on to include editions in poetry, essays, humor, and more.

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Bookslinger Update: “Lions”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Three Messages and a Warning edited by Eduardo Jiménez Mayo and Chris N. Brown, published by Small Beer Press. The author of “Lions” is Bernardo Fernandez. A huge, energetic, and ambitious groundbreaking anthology from emerging and established Mexican authors which showcases all-new supernatural folktales, alien incursions, ghost stories, apocalyptic narratives, and more. Stereotypes of Mexican identities and fictions are identified and transcended. Traditional tales rub shoulders with mind-bending new worlds. Welcome to the new Mexican fantastic.

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Bookslinger Update: “The King of Siam”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Make It, Take It by Rus Bradburd, published by Cinco Puntos Press. An inventive novel, Make It, Take It sneaks the reader past the press conferences, locker rooms, and huddles of college basketball. Without judgment or sentimentality, Rus Bradburd lays bare the web of conflicts between players and coaches, blacks and whites, revealing the complex humanity of a team’s inner circle. Here, every choice has a very real cost.

Steve Pytel is an assistant coach and top recruiter for a university basketball program. His goals are simple. He wants to keep his job and be a head coach someday. Keeping his wife barely makes the list. The team staggers; everyone’s days are numbered. Pytel was responsible for landing prized recruits Leonard Redmond and Jamal Davis. Pytel’s duties now? Keep Leonard out of jail. Make sure Jamal ignores the advice of his preacher, sidesteps his girlfriend’s pregnancy, and puts the ball in the basket. Good thing Pytel doesn’t carry around a bagful of scruples.

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Bookslinger Update: “Blood Secrets”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story comes from Blood Secrets by Nadine McInnis, published by Biblioasis. In Nadine McInnis’s sophomore collection, boozers repent, gamblers reform, cheaters suffer, the deaf speak volumes, and cancer patients string flowers in their hair. Probing and compassionate, executed with a steady hand, Blood Secrets is an excavation of endings and their revelations: the affair that ends a marriage, the disease that ends a life, the effect of a long-ago suicide. And as her characters struggle to administer to each other in their final moments, each story becomes an autopsy, dissecting bodies for their secrets and daily life for the things it hides.

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Bookslinger Update: “Did He Do It?”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from The Governess and Other Stories by Stefan Zweig, published by Pushkin Press. An eclectic collection of four brilliant stories, including a Renaissance tragedy and an English whodunit. These four stories illustrate the wide range of Zweig’s subject matter dating from quite early in his career as a writer of fiction (“The Governess,” rooted in a world of strict Edwardian morality), to late (“Did He Do It?,” almost an English detective story set near Bath, where Zweig lived in exile).

“Stefan Zweig’s time of oblivion is over for good. . . . It’s good to have him back.”—Salman Rushdie, New York Times

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