Tag Archives: coffee house

Bookslinger Update: “Windeye”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

9781566892988The story this week comes from Windeye by Brian Evenson, published by Coffee House Press. A woman falling out of sync with the world; a king’s servant hypnotized by his murderous horse; a transplanted ear with a mind of its own—the characters in these stories live as interlopers in a world shaped by mysterious disappearances and unfathomable discrepancies between the real and imagined. Brian Evenson, master of literary horror, presents his most far-ranging collection to date, exploring how humans can persist in an increasingly unreal world. Haunting, gripping, and psychologically fierce, these tales illuminate a dark and unsettling side of humanity.

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Bookslinger Update: “Stars of the Silver Screen”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

9781566891264This week’s story is from Little Casino by Gilbert Sorrentino, published by Coffee House Press. In this superb novel composed of fragments of memory, Gilbert Sorrentino captures the unconventional nuances of a conventional world. A masterful collage of events is evocatively chained together by secrets and hidden truths that are almost accidentally revealed. Each episode, affectingly textured with penetrating detail, ferrets out the gristle and unconventional beauty found in the voices of the working-class inhabitants from an irretrievable, golden age Brooklyn.

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Bookslinger Update: “Last Cottage”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

9781566893381The story today is from The Rise & Fall of the Scandamerican Domestic by Christopher Merkner and published by Coffee House Press. In these stories, an enraged village gaslights unsuspecting vacationers and a young man delays an impending confession, fondling the nostrils of his mother’s pet pig. Sharp and uneasy, for these inheritors of tradition, that which binds them most closely—offering stability and identity and comfort—are precisely the qualities that set them back, pull them down, burden, limit, and ruin them.

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