Tag Archives: Sarabande

Bookslinger Update: “Real Life”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

9781936747665This week’s story comes from Red Holler and is by Donald Ray Pollock, published by Sarabande Books. This collection takes us over and beyond the stock imagery of rural mountain communities. We travel into housing projects, forest-stripped ravines, and trailer parks, to explore vibrant hometown and migrant Appalachian cultures. Drawing on Appalachian literature’s roots in Native American myth, African American urban legend, and European folk culture, and embracing Appalachian urban fiction, the Southern Gothic, gritty no-holds-barred realism, and magical realism, the stories and poems of Red Holler elegantly cohere to perfectly depict what makes Appalachia so fascinating: its irreverent and outlaw challenges to mainstream notions of propriety and convention.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App

Bookslinger Update: “Blue”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

9781936747641The story this week comes from Fire Year by Jason K. Friedman, published by Sarabande Books. Friedman investigates art, sexuality, love, and religion in seven unconventional and engrossing short stories. A gay man attends his high school reunion in Savannah, where he’s pursued by the now-married former football star. An awkward teenager grapples with notions of God and girls at his bar mitzvah. A curator’s assistant struggles to understand a five hundred-year-old Italian painter’s body of work, until his boyfriend (whom he’s previously written off as frivolous), makes an accidental discovery that challenges decades of art criticism. A moving picture of the trials religious, cultural, and sexual minorities experience in Georgia and the Deep South.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App

Bookslinger Update: “Arboretum”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Greetings from Below by David Philip Mullins, published by Sarabande Books. What would have become of Nick Adams if he’d been born along the ragged edges of a new American city, one with more churches per capita than any other, and twice the suicide rate? Meet Nick Danze, the main character of David Philip Mullins’s vital debut collection, Greetings from Below. The opening story finds fourteen-year-old Nick and his pal Kilburg sitting in the Las Vegas desert, drinking whiskey from Kilburg’s fake leg. It’s the first of many shocks in Nick’s sexual education, which begins with a kiss from Kilburg he calls “practice.” In later stories, Nick hires a call girl, visits a swingers’ club on Christmas Eve, obsesses over obese middle-aged women, and meets the love of his life, Annie, only he’s not sure he loves her and he’s compulsively unfaithful. Ashamed of his behavior, he stubbornly repeats it. And lurking behind it all is Vegas, with its gilded casinos, neon-tinted suburbs, and dingy, outer-ring strip clubs. In Nick’s wounded honesty and queasy self-consciousness, Mullins awakens us to the perverse power of alienation and shame.

App_Store_Badge_EN_0609 2

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App

Bookslinger Update: “Benjamin”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Transgressions by Sallie Bingham, published by Sarabande Books. In her wise and sexy new collection, Sallie Bingham examines modern-day “transgressions” in affairs of the heart. She offers up a ménage à trois, an older woman’s affair with a student, a painter who uses his age as an excuse to behave indecorously. But the reader quickly discovers the real transgressions are those of the self against the self.

App_Store_Badge_EN_0609 2

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App

Bookslinger Update: “Nephilim”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Rise by L. Annette Binder, published by Sarabande Books. The stories in Rise are fairytales, except that the witch, lucky Hans, and the frog prince are characters at the fringes of everyday life. There are rockets, swells of starlings, and children who disappear into thin air. L. Annette Binder writes magical tales with authority and restraint, and we believe her stories, every one.

“Binder has gone so deeply, and with such mystical brilliance and loyalty, into her own world that she has brought mine to me in high relief. She both casts a spell and breaks it. To experience Rise is to experience wonder.”
—Laura Kasischke

App_Store_Badge_EN_0609 2

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App

Bookslinger Update: “The Country Music Songbook”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Something in My Eye by Michael Jeffrey Lee, published by Sarabande Books. Michael Jeffrey Lee’s stories are bizarre and smart and stilted, like dystopic fables told by a redneck Samuel Beckett. Outcasts hunker under bridges, or hole up in bars, waiting for the hurricane to hit. Lee’s forests are full of menace too–unseen crowds gather at the tree-line, and bands of petty crooks and marauders bluster their way into suicidal games of one-upmanship. In Something In My Eye, violence and idleness are always in tension, ratcheting up and down with an eerie and effortless force. Diction leaps between registers with the same vertiginous swoops, moving from courtly formality to the funk and texture of a slang that is all the characters’ own. It’s a masterful performance, and Lee’s inventiveness accomplishes that very rare feat-hyper-stylized structure and language that achieve clarity out of turbulence, never allowing technique to obscure what’s most important: a direct address that makes visible all those we’d rather not see.

App_Store_Badge_EN_0609 2

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App

Bookslinger Update: “Winter Term”

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from Mending by Sallie Bingham, published by Sarabande Books.

“Sallie Bingham binds her collection together with sheer talent. The title novella is absolutely first-rate—a skillfully suggestive amalgam of Katherine Mansfield and Eudora Welty. This same unblinking gaze is hard at work on the desperate terror of adolescent love (‘Winter Term’).”—James R. Frakes, The New York Times Book Review

“Sallie Bingham’s characters scrutinize their relationships with children, lovers, and their own treacherous souls. . . . Nearly every one of these flinty stories is a tiny masterpiece.”—Entertainment Weekly

“Hardened but not compromised by adult life, these luminous stories . . . feature narrators who find mature, often solitary forms of reckoning, and even happiness. . . . There is not a false note in Bingham’s striking collection.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

App_Store_Badge_EN_0609 2

Leave a comment

Filed under Bookslinger App